Creativity

Why an Eccentric Brazilian Billionaire Dug a Grave for His Bentley

Count Chiquinho Scarpa's Latest Quirky Stunt Had a Surprisingly Good Cause

Published on Oct 28, 2013

Editor's Pick

In Brazil, Count Chiquinho Scarpa is a billionaire known for outrageous acts, like willing his fortunes to his cockatoo and hinting that he once bedded Caroline of Monaco. Recently on Facebook, he announced his latest exploit -- that he would putting his $500,000 Bentley six feet under. The count made a post that after he was done driving his expensive vehicle, he would bury it in his yard, just as pharoahs did with their precious possessions. The announcement riled the masses in Brazil, leading to tons of buzz in social media and the press, including the U.K.'s Metro and The Daily Mail.

On the day of the burial, Scarpa's real intentions were revealed. As the press gathered around Scarpa, the Bentley and a big hole in the ground, it was announced that the event marked the opening of "National Organ Donation Week," and Scarpa's stunt turned out to be the launching pad of a campaign out of Leo Burnett Tailor Made. "I didn't bury my car, but everyone thought it absurd when I said I would," he said. "What's absurd is burying your organs, which can save you many lives. Nothing is more valuable. Be a donor and tell your family."

Speaking of donations, Leo Burnett Tailor Made was also behind the much-celebrated campaign "My Blood is Red and Black." Created in conjunction with Brazilian sports club Vitoria, the effort sucked the color red out of soccer players' jerseys in a symbolic message to encourage blood donations in the community.

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About

Credits

Date
Oct 28, 2013
Agency:
Leo Burnett Tailor Made - Brazil
Client:
Brazilian Association of Organ Transplant
Creative VP/Chief Creative Officer:
Marcelo Reis
Creative Director:
Rodrigo Jatene
Creative:
Christian Fontana
Creative:
Marcelo Rizerio

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