Creativity

Kickass Middle-Aged Women Are the Heroes in This Video Game Ad

Spot for Detective Title Criminal Case Defies Category Stereotypes

By Alexandra Jardine. Published on Jun 09, 2017

Editor's Pick

Most gaming ads aim squarely at men, but a new spot promoting "Criminal Case Pacific Bay" goes after female players by way of featuring some kickass women.

The ad, by Untitled Worldwide, shows an array of middle-aged women, including a school mom and a female executive in a presentation, responding to a siren with some action hero-style moves and joining forces to hunt down a criminal. Thierry Poiraud at Independent directed the film, which is running in the U.S. on TV and online.

Although Criminal Case, owned by French gaming company Pretty Simple, has an audience both male and female, Untitled's research found that 80% of the active players are women aged between 30 and 55. According to the agency, it found this especially significant because the middle-aged female demographic is often left out of video game culture, often stereotyped as fans of puzzle games like Candy Crush rather than action games. The campaign for new installment "Pacific Bay" therefore seeks to be a "a call to arms to women step out of their daily lives and go solve crime."

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About

Credits

Date
Jun 09, 2017
Agency:
Untitled Worldwide
Client:
Criminal Case
Managing Partner:
Susie Macarthur
Creative Director:
Dexter Ginn
Creative Director:
David Chalu
Director of Integrated Production:
Cheri Anderson
Agency Producer:
Karen Egan
Director:
Thierry Poiraud
Production Company:
Independent Films
Production Company:
Lab House
Editorial House:
Cut & Run
Editor:
Julian Tranquille
Casting Director:
Ali Fearnley
Post Production House:
Electric Theatre Collective
Music:
Original
Music House:
Major Tom
Composer:
Redman /Creevy

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