Intricate Paper Art Illustrates the Trap of Illiteracy in Indian Campaign

Artists Created Images Using 'Quilling' for CRY America

Published on

Editor's Pick

To highlight how illiteracy in India can damage a child's chances, a campaign for literacy charity Child Rights and You (CRY) America makes use of intricate paper art in the shape of thumbprints.

BBH India worked on the campaign, which is aimed to ensure children across CRY America-supported projects in India go to school and complete their education. Its central image is a child breaking out of a thumbprint. In India, the thumbprint, which is commonly used to denote identity, becomes a symbol of shame and illiteracy when used in lieu of a written signature.

To demonstrate the treacherous snare of illiteracy, three different ads have been created wherein the thumbprint is depicted as a maze, a valley and a forest; with a child making his way out in each. For the imagery, BBH commissioned various Indian artists to recreate the fingerprint in the form of a maze, valley and forest using a form of paper art called quilling.

The campaign will run digitally, including on the CRY America microsite.

Rate this Ad
No starts selected .5 stars 1 star 1.5 stars 2 stars 2.5 stars 3 stars 3.5 stars 4 stars 4.5 stars 5 stars

You must be registered to rate the ad. Please Login or Register Now


May 24, 2016
BBH Mumbai
Chief Creative Officer:
Russell Barrett
CRY America
Chief Executive Officer:
Subhash Kamath
Creative Director / Art:
Sapna Ahluwalia
Yohan Daver
Sean De Jervis Sequeira
Art Director:
Rebecca Daniel
Art Director:
Kushal Birari
Art Director:
Chetan Mahajan
Anant Nanvare
Abhijit Kalan
Pratim Shankar
Saish Kambli
Avinash Mahadik
Agency Producer:
Reema Asrani
Senior Business Partner:
Rutika Shroff
Business Partner:
Monisha Khanna
Business Partner:
Ankita Kadambande
Latest Creativity News on Ad Age

Related work

The Creativity Daily Newsletter

Get highlights of the most important daily news delivered to your e-mail inbox. Receive Our Newsletters.

Become a Member of Ad Age