DC Comics Debuts a Simple, Muscular New Logo

Symbol Simplifies, With an Eye to Past and Future

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D.C. Comics has unveiled a new logo, its 10th since the company was founded in 1940. The new logo features the company's initials in stylized, muscular block letters -- the "C" looks a bit like Superman's flexed bicep, while pointed indentations bring to mind Batman's ears. The figures bump up against a circle that encloses them, all of it in a single bright blue hue. The new symbol replaces the most recent peel-style "DC" and seems to harken back the company's logo from the early '70s, which featured its eponymous letters in red caps, surrounded by a thin black circle. (See a nice history of its logos on the blog Signalnoise).

Created by Emily Oberman and her team at Pentagram, the logo is meant to leverage "over 80 years of heritage with an eye toward the future," according to a DC statement. It officially debuts on May 25 with the release of "DC Universe: Rebirth Special #1" by Geoff Johns.

"While comics continue to be the heart and soul of DC, the brand has evolved to now stand for powerful storytelling across so many different forms of media," said Amit Desai, DC Entertainment senior VP- marketing and global franchise management, in the statement. "DC is home to the greatest Super Heroes and Super-Villains, and the new logo has the character and strength to stand proudly alongside DC's iconic symbols," "The launch of the new logo is the perfect tribute to DC's legacy, exciting future and most importantly, our fans."

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About

Credits
Date
May 18, 2016
Client:
DC Comics
Design Studio:
Pentagram/New York
Designer:
Emily Oberman
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