Street Art Highlights the Painful Realities of Youth Homelessness in This Charity Campaign

Campaign by Leo Burnett Includes Spray Painted Messages on Buildings

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U.K. charity End Youth Homelessness is using spray-painted street art to communicate the tragic reasons young people find themselves on the streets as part of an integrated campaign.

Agency Leo Burnett London sprayed type-led illustrations on the outside of buildings across the U.K., highlighting the painful realities that drive a young person to leave home. For example, one illustration shows a boy walking on a tightrope formed out of words describing his dilemma: "Living at home with addict parents or living on the street with addicts."

The campaign, which launched on World Homeless Day (Oct. 10), also includes posters and a short animated online film, directed by FX Goby through Nexus, depicting a figure climbing precariously between the spray-painted words.

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About

Credits
Date
Oct 11, 2016
Agency:
Leo Burnett London
Chief Creative Officer:
Chaka Sobhani
Client:
End Youth Homelessness
Creative Director:
Richard Ince
Creative Director:
Ed Tillbrook
Creative Director:
Adam Tucker
Art Director:
Ed Tillbrook
Copywriter:
Richard Ince
Graphic Designer:
Marc Donaldson
Account Director:
Sarah Kay
Account Manager:
Ali Wilde
Agency Producer:
Michelle Hickey
FX Director:
FX Goby
Director:
FX Goby
Production Company:
Nexus
Executive Producer:
Jeremy Smith
Producer:
Fernanda Garcia Lopez
Technical Director:
Elliot Kajdan
Actor:
Jonathan Burteaux
Audio:
Sam Robson
Audio Company:
750 MPH
Record Label:
Warp Records
Artist:
Mark Pritchard
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