Creativity

Google: Introducing Google Fiber

Google's TV and Internet get a cute video.

Published on Jul 26, 2012

Editor's Pick

Google takes one more step towards domination of the entire Internet. The tech company today announced "Fiber," a $70 per month Internet and television service that puts it directly into competition with companies like Time Warner, Verizon and Optimum. Touted to be a 100 times faster than today's broadband, the service is currently only available in Kansas City, Kan., and Kansas City, Miss. People can pre-register starting now, and then Google will determine, according to the number of registrations, in which neighborhoods Fiber will roll out.

In typical Google fashion, it released this adorable, lo-fi, animated video that shows cars rolling along on an information superhighway, through the ages of the Internet connection, from slow dial-up, to broadband, to the speed of Fiber. Google's famed Street View car also makes a cameo in the film, which shows how a slow Internet speed can affect your life, with buffering YouTube videos, slow download and transfer speeds and trouble getting your emails.

Rate this Ad

You must be registered to rate this ad.
Please Login or Register Now

About

Credits

Date
Jul 26, 2012
Agency:
Venables Bell & Partners
Client:
Google
ECD:
Paul Venables
ECD:
Will McGinness
CD:
David Kim
CD:
Tom Scharpf
AD:
Ezra Paulekas
CW:
Kelly Diaz
CW:
Rob Calabro
Director:
Ben Steiger Levine
CD:
Aaron Duffy
EP:
Sam Penfield
EP:
Mikha Grumet
Head Of Production:
Dave Schulenberg
Producer:
Leanne Amos
Production Supervisor:
Tamika Miller
Production Coordinator:
Fryza Griggs
Director of Photography:
Will Rexer
AD:
Bob Partington
Storyboard:
Carlos Ancalmo
Editing Company:
Lost Planet
Editor:
Tyler Higgins
Sound Design:
740 Sound Design & Mix
Sound Designer:
Eddie Kim
Sound Designer:
Rommel Molina
Sound Design Executive Producer:
Scott Ganary
Music:
Human
Mix:
Lime
VFX:
Liquid
VFX Producer:
Erica Headley

The Creativity Newsletter

The Creativity newsletter is editorially curated to spotlight the work that’s hitting the mark—or missing it altogether. Sign up to have it sent to your inbox.