Creativity

This Women's Day Campaign Highlights the Gender Disparity of Animated Characters

Charity Inspiring Girls Has Created Cartoon Role Models Like 'Carla the Coder'

By Alexandra Jardine. Published on Mar 08, 2017

Editor's Pick

An International Women's Day campaign by U.K. charity Inspiring Girls takes aim at the world of animation, pointing out that young girls lack strong female role models in the realm of cartoons.

The campaign, "It's Time To Get Animated," exposes the gender bias in childhood cartoons where only 29% of all animated characters are women. In a film, by MullenLowe London, animator Sophie Markca points out that while kids watch and learn from "Bob The Builder" and "Postman Pat," women in animation tend to be princesses or lovelorn females. The film, directed by Sophie Markatatos at Strange Beast, is supported by four print executions created by female designers: "Angela The Astronaut," designed by Lizzie Campbell, "Cathy The Carpenter," designed by Be Towers, "Sally The Scientist," by Ariane Pelissoni and "Carla The Coder," by Abigail de la Cruz.

The campaign follows the charity's "Redraw the Balance" work last year in which elementary school children were asked to draw a firefighter, a surgeon, and a fighter pilot, and mostly drew men, before meeting real-life women in those professions.

Inspiring Girls, set up and chaired by Miriam Gonzalez (a top Spanish lawyer and wife of former U.K. deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg) is dedicated to raising the aspirations of young girls around the world by connecting girls with female role models. Volunteers can sign up and pledge just one hour per year to visit a school to talk to a group of girls about their life, career and experiences.

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About

Credits

Date
Mar 08, 2017
Agency:
MullenLowe London
Client:
Inspiring Girls
Director:
Sophie Markatatos
Production Company:
Strange Beast

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