Creativity

This PSA Insists There Should Be No More Female Professionals -- for a Reason

Film by Inspiring the Future Follows 2016's 'Redraw the Balance' With Another Original Take on Gender Bias

By Alexandra Jardine. Published on Mar 16, 2018

Editor's Pick

U.K. educational nonprofit Inspiring the Future previously caught our attention with a 2016 PSA in which kids were asked to draw pictures of professionals, revealing gender stereotypes and bias, before being introduced to women doing those jobs. The work received attention from the UN, which recreated the experiment, and has received over 40 million views.

Agency MullenLowe London, which worked on that project, has followed it up with a second film, which once again has an original take on gender bias. In the film, we see professional men -- and women -- making what seem like shocking statements. For example, there should be no more female builders, soldiers, surgeons, drummers or CEOs. Towards the end of the film, however, it's revealed that there's a twist. They aren't actually being sexist after all -- what they are saying is that there should just be builders, soldiers and CEOs without a mention of their being "female."

Nick Chambers, Chief Executive of the Education and Employers taskforce, which runs Inspiring the Future, comments in a statement: "In 2016 we successfully shone a light on the young age that gender stereotyping takes hold. A lot of progress has been made when it comes to gender equality, but the language that we use in the workplace still paves the way for unconscious bias. And that in turn can affect the dreams and aspirations of future generations. We're here to correct that. And that's exactly what this campaign sets out to do."

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About

Credits

Date
Mar 16, 2018
Agency:
MullenLowe London
Client:
Inspiring the Future

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