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Julyna: Dryer

Make your pubic hair public knowledge.

Editor's Pick

Cossette Toronto gives hairstyling a whole new meaning with a series of spots for Julyna, a Canadian cervical cancer campaign that asks women to maintain their pubic hair for a month -- and ask coworkers and friends to donate to the cause in return for them doing so.

Barring all the awkwardness that would ensue if you started discussing your intimate grooming habits with your coworkers (the Julyna site has a list of "designs" you can pick from which might make for a good conversations starter), the television work is quite clever in its simplicity. "Chair," "Dryer," and "Mirror," will get you to look at these salon fixtures in a whole new way.

Julyna is almost over, but it's never too late to support the fight against cervical cancer, so if you're interested in getting involved, the campaign site has plenty of tips, tricks and even a section that tells you to "Throw Your Own Event."

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About

Credits
Date
Jul 31, 2012
Agency:
Cossette Toronto
Client:
Julyna
Co-Chief Creative Officer:
David Daga
Co-Chief Creative Officer:
Matthew Litzinger
Creative Director:
David Daga
Creative Director:
Matthew Litzinger
Art Director:
Tricia Piasecki
Writer:
Tina Vahn
Agency Producer:
Colleen Floyd
Production House:
Circle Productions
Director:
Diana Berdichevsky
Line Producer:
Dolores Salken
EP:
Karen Tameanko
Casting:
Powerhouse
Editor:
Gerrit Van Dyke (Soda Post)
Sound Designer:
Rocco Gagliese
Engineer:
Nathan Handy
Colourist:
Tricia Hagoriles
Conform Artist:
Naveen Srivastava
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