Creativity

These 'Man Boobs' Provide a Useful Breast Self-Exam Demo

Ad by David Challenges Censorship Rules

By Alexandra Jardine. Published on Apr 22, 2016

Editor's Pick

A new campaign from Argentina for the Movimiento Ayuda Cáncer de Mama MACMA (Breast Cancer Help Movement) demonstrates how to do a breast self-exam using an overweight naked guy with "man boobs." This, it explains, is because of social media censorship of naked female breasts -- which doesn't extend to men.

The resulting film by agency David's Buenos Aires office is a clever and effective piece of communication which makes you realize how ridiculous the censorship rules, informs you what to do and possibly makes you laugh as well. Oh, and there's also a helpful reminder that men can get breast cancer too.

Joaquin Cubria and Ignacio Ferioli, executive creative directors at David, said in a statement: "It's hard to get women over 25 to examine their breasts regularly to prevent breast cancer. But it isn't hard to make them check their phones every five minutes. Therefore, we decided to get to them. That is when we bumped into another problem: breasts are not very welcome; they are censored. Even when teaching how to perform a BSE for the early detection of breast cancer. That is where 'manboobs4boobs' comes in."

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About

Credits

Date
Apr 22, 2016
Agency:
David Buenos Aires
Client:
MACMA
Executive Creative Director:
Joaquin Cubria
Executive Creative Director:
Ignacio Ferioli
Copywriter:
Juan Pena
Art Director:
Ricardo Casal
General Account Director:
Emanuel Abeijon
Account Director:
Lucila Castellani
Account Executive:
Brenda Ranieri
Head of Production:
Brenda Morrison Fell
Agency Producer:
Felipe Calvino
Production House:
LANDIA
Executive Producer:
Adrian D'Amario
Producer:
Thomas Amoedo
Director of Photography:
Nicolas Hardy
Sound Mix:
Porta Estudio
Music:
Cluster
Editor:
Ana Svarz

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