Creativity

This Wine Brand Is Using a Totally Obnoxious Vineyard Owner as Its Pitchman

Charles Faircloth Exists to Highlight Onehope Wines' Philanthropy

By Alexandra Jardine. Published on Nov 03, 2016

Editor's Pick

Here's a brave approach for a wine brand: an ad presented by a thoroughly obnoxious vineyard owner who also happens to be a terrible pitchman.

But the (fictional) winemaker, Charles Faircloth, is there for a reason: to highlight Onehope Wines' philanthropic approach to its own winemaking. The creation of agency Erich & Kallman, he delivers a great script about his privileged lifestye -- lines include "I built my own internet just so I don't have to see posts from all the weirdos" -- as well as some madly outrageous ideas, like dressing servants as giant chess pieces, so he can have a giant chessboard in his backyard.

Eventually, Faircloth gets around to half-heartedly promoting Onehope Wines, which donates meals to people in need for every dollar you spend. The fact that he's totally bored by this idea is, of course, designed to highlight Onehope's own very different philosophy.

The online spot was directed by Aaron Stoller of Biscuit Filmworks.

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Credits

Date
Nov 03, 2016
Agency:
Erich & Kallman San Francisco
Client:
ONEHOPE Wines
Creative Director:
Eric Kallman
Managing Director:
Steve Erich
Head of Account:
Kate Higgins
Producer:
Jill Garrison
Production Company:
Biscuit Filmworks
Director:
Aaron Stoller
Managing Director:
Shawn Lacy
Executive Producer:
Holly Vega
Producer:
Peter Owen
Head of Production:
Rachel Glaub
Director of Photography:
Bryan Newman
Editorial Company:
ARCADE
Editor:
Jeff Ferruzzo
Producer:
Gavin Carroll
Graphics:
Central Office
Designer:
Max Erdenberger
Original Music, Sound Design and Mix:
Barking Owl
Creative Director/Executive Producer:
Kelly Bayett
Composer:
Houston Fry
Mixer:
Patrick Navarre

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