Boxer Amir Khan Turns a Pakistan City Into His Gym to Plug a PepsiCo Energy Drink

Spot For Energy Drink Sting Got Over 12 Million Views

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PepsiCo's Sting energy drink racked up millions of views with this energetic spot from BBDO and Proximity Pakistan that shows boxer Amir Khan training in the old city in Lahore, Pakistan, scaling scaffolding, leapfrogging over a rickshaw and getting chased through alleyways by fans.

Fans have been eagerly awaiting Mr. Khan's next fight, since he's been out of competition since May, when he got knocked out by Saul 'Canelo' Alvarez.

Mr. Khan, who was born in the U.K. and is of Pakistani descent, made his name at age 17 at the 2004 Olympics in Athens by winning a silver for Britain before he turned pro. Last year, he expressed interest in returning to the Olympics in Rio to represent Pakistan, though that didn't happen. With PepsiCo's video, fans in Pakistan have been happy to see him back on their turf. There's a note of patriotism in the film, and one shot shows Mr. Khan against the backdrop of Pakistan's flag.

The video has reached more than 11 million views on Facebook and 1 million on YouTube since it was posted Feb. 12. BBDO says it's been "the strongest campaign in terms of views and engagement by PepsiCo Asia-Pacific this quarter."

In another facet of the campaign, fans could use social media to challenge Mr. Khan to training tasks. In one, he has to see how many jabs he can reach in a minute (143); in another, he's asked to hit a punching bag to the rhythm of a dhol, a double-headed drum.

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About

Credits
Date
Mar 28, 2017
Agency:
BBDO and Proxmity Pakistan
Client:
PepsiCo
Industry
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