Creativity

Tearjerker About Hard-Working Mom and Her Boy Shows What's Really Important for Chinese New Year

Leo Burnett Malaysia Tells Sad Tale for Petronas

By Ann-Christine Diaz. Published on Feb 09, 2016

Editor's Pick

While Thailand may be the home of sadvertising, Malaysia has also posed some serious competition, including this new film celebrating Chinese New Year 2016, from Leo Burnett Kuala Lumpur for Malaysian oil and gas company Petronas.

The story centers on one unlucky lad, who's bullied by his peers for being poor. They call him "Rubber Boy" because his mom taps rubber trees for a living, which apparently, only affords the family just enough for the bare essentials.

Frustrated after an especially brutal day with his classmates, the boy takes it out on his mom, telling her she needs to work harder so he can enjoy the toys and food that are a given during the Chinese New Year -- for seemingly everyone but him.

His mother, no doubt frustrated, responds by telling him to come to work with her the next day. After a few hours on the job, the boy realizes his grave mistake.

"We believe this story is relatable to us all," said Leo Burnett Creative Director James Yap in a statement. "We are guilty of this at one point or another where in chasing our dreams, we lose sight of what's important -- our loved ones. We hope that 'Rubber Boy' will inspire Malaysians to take a minute to appreciate their greatest blessings."

Leo Burnett Group Malaysia has been the agency for Petronas for nearly two decades. The Chinese New Year 2016 campaign, which runs through Feb.15, also includes a social component that asks Malaysians to share their #greatestblessing, some of which will be turned into comic illustrations. See more about the effort, include a Behind-the-Scenes of the ad on the campaign site.

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About

Credits

Date
Feb 09, 2016
Agency:
Leo Burnett - Kuala Lumpur
Client:
Petronas

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