This PSA Shows What It's Like to Be 'Paralyzed' by Anxiety

Film From Pro Infirmis Aims to Show That Fear Can Be a Disability

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This sobering film from Switzerland shows what it's like to be literally "paralyzed" by anxiety disorder. Created for the NGO Pro Infirmis by Jung Von Matt Limmat, it shows someone suffering from the condition being taken on a trip to the grocery store by a man in a wheelchair (who turns out to be his neighbor). The anxiety sufferer sits on his lap throughout, looking terrified by simple things such as leaving the house, crossing the street among crowds of people an negotiating a grocery aisle.

Directed by Martin Werner, the film is aimed at demonstrating how a person suffering from an anxiety disorder often has bigger obstacles to overcome in their day-to-day life than a person in a wheelchair. It highlights the fact that some 80,0000 people in Switzerland suffer from anxiety and are unable to lead a normal life as a result.

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About

Credits
Date
Jun 01, 2016
Agency:
Jung von Matt Limmat
Client:
Pro Infirmis
Director:
Martin Werner
Head of Communications:
Mark Zumbühl
Executive Board Member:
Mark Zumbühl
Communications Consultant:
Bettina Konetschnig
Social Media:
Bettina Konetschnig
Executive Creative Director:
Alexander Jaggy
Creative Director:
Pablo Schencke
Creative Director:
Johannes Raggio
Graphic Design:
Bettina Ehrismann
Consultant:
Marco Dettling
Consultant:
Marcel Mägerle
Consultant:
Marie Leggeri
Media Relations:
Nicole Hoppler
Media Relations:
Nathalie Eggen
Art Buying:
Deborah Herzig
Film Production:
Pumpkin Film
Director:
Martin Werner
Photographer:
Thomas Juul
Media:
Konnex DotKom
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