Just Why Is This Guy 'Barry Ogden' a Celebrity in His Hometown?

Perhaps His Initials Are a Clue in Rexona's Latest Ads

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In this Australian campaign by deodorant brand Rexona, an ordinary guy called Barry Ogden is really proud of the fact that he's something of a celebrity in his hometown -- but blissfully ignorant as to why. He gets special seats at restaurant, his own office at work, and people pointing at him on the bus. Perhaps his initials, B.O., are a clue: the campaign advocates that you don't become famous for it.

The online campaign is by JWT Sydney and directed by Dave Wood at Plaza. It's the first creative work for Rexona from the agency. Simon Langley, the executive dreative director, said in a statement: "Sometimes you can be famous for all the wrong reasons. We wanted to use humour to highlight the fact that some people are completely unaware that they have bad body odour, and challenge them to consider whether they are using the most effective products."

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About

Credits
Date
Jul 19, 2016
Agency:
J. Walter Thompson
Client:
Rexona
Client Marketing Director:
Jon McCarthy
Marketing Manager:
John McKeon
Senior Assistant Brand Manager:
Estefania Rubinat
Assistant Brand Manager:
Morgan McBain
Creative:
JWT
Executive Creative Director:
Simon Langley
Copywriter:
Giles Clayton
Art Director:
Simon Hayes
Planner:
Carly Yanco
GAD:
Milly Hall
GAD:
Ana Lynch
Director:
Dave Wood
Production Company:
Plaza Films
Producer:
Amanda Slatyer
Company:
JWT
Producer:
Lee Thomson
Company:
Plaza Films
Editor:
Gaby Muri
Post Production:
Heckler
Audio Post Production:
Sound Reservoir
Media Agency:
PHD
PR Agency:
Liquid Ideas
Industry
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