Keegan-Michael Key Predicts the Scariest 'Weather' Ever if Trump Becomes President

Film From Joss Whedon's Save the Day Uses Forecast as Metaphor for U.S. Under Donald

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An epically frightening weather forecast is a metaphor for America under a Trump presidency in a hilarious new ad from Joss Whedon's voter organization Save the Day, starring comedian/actor Keegan-Michael Key.

Key plays a weatherman named Fred, who gives his prediction just as the country is about to swear in the Republican candidate for office. He foresees such conditions as a "heavy wave of denial coming from both coasts, dropping a high blood pressure front right in the front of the country," civil unrest getting pushed back to the mid-'60s and early '70s" and a "massive construction front" along the bottom of California and Texas that builds up slightly but "falls apart long before it finishes."

But it's "not all bad news," he says. "The rise in both temperature and existential misery should be cooled by the nuclear winter coming in from the south east. That should take out all sentient life on the continent and we can look for that in the first 100 days."

The ad also suggests, very strongly, that supporters of candidates other than Hillary Clinton are wasting their votes. As a weepy broadcaster sheds tears over the news, Key tells her, "You voted for Jill Stein, you thoughtless ass. Suck it up like the rest of us."

The film continues to use comedy as its ammo, as did the campaign's launch film, which employed a "shit-ton of famous people" to get out the vote.

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Date
Oct 17, 2016
Client:
Save the Day
Category
Industry
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