In a Rio Favela, Shell Creates a Floodlit Soccer Field Powered by Players' Feet

Project by JWT London Uses Kinetic Energy From Floor Tiles

Published on Sep 10, 2014

Editor's Pick

We all know Brazilians love soccer. But it isn't always easy for those in favela communities to find somewhere to play. So Shell has created what it calls a "player-powered football pitch" (field) in a Rio de Janeiro favela, allowing its users to play by floodlight for the first time.

JWT London developed the project at Morro da Mineira, part of a complex of favelas in Rio. The community previously had a largely unusable football pitch, with young people forced to play in the streets and electricity restrictions that meant they could not play after dark. To light it, Shell used 200 high-tech floor tiles that capture kinetic energy created by the movement of the players. This is stored and combined with the power generated by solar panels next to the pitch to convert into renewable electricity for the new floodlights.

The project is part of Shell's #makethefuture program, which is designed to engage a wider audience into the energy conversation and inspire a younger generation to get involved with science. The kinetic technology used was developed by Laurence Kemball-Cook and his company Pavegen, recipients of funding from Shell's LiveWire program for young entrepreneurs in the U.K.

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Sep 10, 2014
JWT London
Global Creative Director:
Axel Chaldecott
Creative Team:
Morten Legarth
Creative Team:
Fabio Maca
Creative Team:
Angela Bassichetti
Creative Team:
Will Brookwell
Creative Team:
Will Helm
Creative Agency Planner:
Rob Alexander
Creative Agency Planner:
Olivia Johnson
Global Director in Charge:
Jonathan Terry
Media Agency:
PR Agency:
Digital Agency:
Production Company:
JWT Live
Campaign Lead:
Jonathan Terry
Event Producer:
Tom O'Donnell
Event Producer:
Ryan Johnson
Event Producer:
Steve Crook

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