Soccer Star Ibrahimovic's Skin Becomes Platform to Fight World Hunger

UN World Food Programme Uses Player's Skin as Media

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Is this the first time an athlete's skin has been used as a communications medium? If so, it's for a good cause. Soccer pro Zlatan Ibrahimovic teamed up with the UN World Food Programme and tattooed his body with 50 names to raise awareness of the estimated 805 million people in the world suffering from hunger.

The player for French team Paris Saint-Germain revealed the temporary tattoos during a soccer game on Valentine's Day when he took off his shirt. He received a warning for disrobing -- a move guaranteed to make headlines among soccer fans around the world. The next day, Mr. Ibrahimovic announced his fight against world hunger at a press conference in Paris.

The names on the player's skin are those of real people, from countries ranging from Bolivia to Syria. Forsman & Bodenfors created the pro bono campaign with production company New Land and the content integration agency Matter.

According to Staffan Lamm, a creative at Forsman & Bodenfors, Mr. Ibrahimovic approached the agency after he was named an ambassador for the UN World Food Programme. He had previously worked with the Swedish agency on a Volvo campaign. Forsman & Bodenfors contacted Marina Catena, director of the World Food Programme in Paris, and came up with the tattoo idea.

"He had a couple of tattoos already of his kids' names," said Mr. Lamm. "From there, we got the idea, what if he played a real game and he had tattooed names of people from the third world."

The original idea was for Mr. Ibrahimovic to remove his jersey and reveal the names after the game was over. But two minutes in, he scored a goal and couldn't resist displaying the tattoos -- ultimately leading to a yellow card penalty. "He told us that after that, he was in another world emotionally, that it was almost a religious feeling," Mr. Lamm said.

But the campaign doesn't end there. Today, Mr. Ibrahimovic made his next move and posted a Facebook picture showing the shoe reading "805 Million Names" that he'll wear during an upcoming PSG Champions League match against Chelsea.

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About

Credits
Date
Feb 17, 2015
Agency:
Forsman & Bodenfors
Client:
UN World Food Programme
creative/writer:
Fredrik Jansson
Creative/Art Director:
Staffan Lamm
Creative/Art Director:
Andreas Malm
Agency Producer:
Jens Odelbring
Web Producer:
Peter Gaudiano
Production Company:
New Land
Production Company:
Iconoclast
Director:
Gustav Johansson
Director of Photgraphy:
Niklas Johansson
Executive Producer:
Erik Torell
Executive Producer:
Solal Micenmacher
Editor:
Robin Siwe
Producer:
Sophie Tamm Christensen
Production Manager:
Sophie Hedberg
Production Manager:
Arnaud Le Mene
Grade:
Annika Pehrson
Sound Design:
Eric Thorsell
Post Production:
Stopp
Post Production:
Family
Web Agency:
Lundgren+Lindqvist
Developer:
Mikael Holm
PR, Social Media & Content Integration:
Mathias Ericsson
PR, Social Media & Content Integration:
Charlotte Henriksson
PR, Social Media & Content Integration:
Tereza Franzen
PR, Social Media & Content Integration:
Matter
Media Partner:
Thor Nielsen
Media Partner:
Jacob Stigler
Media Partner:
BeOn/AOL
Media Partner:
Jakob Stigler
Music Artist:
Jonsi
Written by:
Jón Þór Birgisson
Music Producer:
Jón Þór Birgisson
Music Producer:
Peter Katis
Music Publisher:
Universal Music Publishing Scandinavia
Music Supervisor:
Andre Brink
Music Supervisor:
Andre Brink
Music Label:
Parlophone
Music Label:
XL recordings
Mastered by:
Greg Calbi
Photographer:
Niklas Johansson
Post Production:
Joakim Rissverds
Post Production:
Linjepunkt

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