Train Travel vs Car? It's Spandau Ballet or Speedcore, Say Virgin Trains' Funny Ads

Tom Kuntz Directs Spots That Say it With Music

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Editor's Pick

The smooth sax of Spandau Ballet versus the high tempo hecticness of "Speedcore" punk provide a fun way to contrast train travel to a car or plane journey in a new campaign from the U.K.'s Virgin Trains.

Two spots, created by Anomaly and helmed by top comedy director MJZ's Tom Kuntz, both open with a woman wondering how to travel to an important job interview -- car, plane or Virgin Trains. Scenes from both options are intercut, with the smooth train option set to Spandau Ballet's "True" resulting in a new job and career success, while the other option sees the protagonist, Valerie, become increasingly crazed (in the car scenario, seen here, she ends up getting shamed on social media after a security guard carries her away from the interviewer's office.)

It's entertaining stuff -- even if those who have been stranded on a U.K. train platform by a "leaves on the line" or "wrong kind of snow"-type excuse may not entirely agree.

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About

Credits
Date
Jun 12, 2017
Agency:
Anomaly London
Client:
Virgin Trains
Director:
Tom Kuntz
Producer:
Amy Appleton
Director of Photography:
Alex Barber
Costume:
Mr. Gammon
Production Designer:
Robin Brown
VFX & Design:
The Mill
Executive Producer:
Tom Igglesden
Production Coordinator:
Ellie Joseph
Shoot Supervisor:
Jonathan Westley
Creative Director:
Jonathan Westley
VFX Lead:
Grant Connor
VFX:
Nina Mosand
VFX:
Souhail Wilson
Editor:
Russel Icke
Edit:
Whitehouse Post
Colorist:
James Bamford
Color:
The Mill
Sound Designer:
Sam Ashwell
Sound:
750 MPH
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