Creativity

Vodafone Pushes Youth Brand Voxi With a Film Stuffed Full of Internet Weirdness

Launch Creative Promotes Brand's Unlimited Data on Social Apps

By Alexandra Jardine. Published on Oct 10, 2017

Editor's Pick

A mermaid that turns into sushi. Underarm hair and headless bodies. Dabbing grandmas and cats in underpants. The launch film for Vodafone's youth-targeted mobile brand Voxi has all this, and more, stuffed into two minutes of some of the randomer stuff that's on the internet.

All together, a total of 348 alternative films and images appear in the spot. The idea is to get across the message that Voxi allows for unlimited data on social apps, bringing "Endless Possibilities" to the next generation.

The film was created by Ogilvy London and was headed up by the agency's new head of design, Dani Matthews, who comes from a fashion background and previously held positions at Mr Porter, Finery, H&M, & Calvin Klein. But the agency also worked closely with young creatives, including from its internship scheme The Pipe and the WPP Fellowship, to get input from the brand's proposed target audience.

Matthews says in a statement: "We definitely didn't want to make assumptions about our youth audience. We wanted to communicate to them without labels or putting them in a box. Agencies and brands often group 16 to 24 year olds as the same person. But in reality there is a massive difference in tastes, milestones and preferences as you get older. We've made sure the creative has the flexibility to be democratic to this audience."

The film will appear on social media, in particular in "stories," with the Voxi brand the first advertiser on Snapchat's University Stories. It will be backed by creative content running across Instagram, Snapchat, Twitter, YouTube and Facebook.

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About

Credits

Date
Oct 10, 2017
Agency:
Ogilvy London
Client:
Vodafone

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